Sponsored

Sunday, April 28, 2013

The African Traditional Religion

This landmark study of Ifa, the most important and elaborate system of divination of the Yoruba people of Nigeria, remains a monumental contribution to scholarship in anthropology, folklore, religion, philosophy, linguistics, and African and African-American studies. Yoruba religion has a direct link to a substantial segment of American society for . . . ``the greatest percentage of Africans enslaved for the New World labor came from the Yoruba nation'' of Nigeria, West Africa. 
Karade traces the concepts of the Yoruba religion through its entrance into the Americas via Haiti, Puerto Rico, Brazil and Cuba. Variations such as Santeria and Voodoo have accumulated some negative connotations, but Karade maintains persuasively that ``Yoruba religion is not a cult nor is it `occult,' but rather a divine journey to the inner self and to God-consciousness.'' 
Readers of this straightforward text will find familiar concepts such as angels and even an elevated stature comparable to that of the ``son of God'' in the person of Orunmila, the prophet of Yoruba religion. Further, the text compares Yoruba religious concepts to those of other religions in order to make understanding the tradition even easier. Prayers and rituals (e.g., herbal baths, etc.) complete this interesting handbook. Illustrated.

In this introductory volume, Baba Ifa Karade provides an easily understandable overview of the Yoruba religion. He describes 16 orisha and shows us how to work with divination, to use the chakras to internalize the teachings of Yoruba, and describes howto create a sacred place of worship. Includes prayers, dances, songs, offerings, and sacrifices to honor the orisha and egun. Illustrations, charts, glossary, bibliography, and index. Click Here for The Handbook of Yoruba Religious Concepts



The sacred texts of Ifa, repository of the accumulated wisdom of countless generations of Yoruba people, are an invaluable source not only for all students of African oral literature and Yoruba civilization, but also for future generations interested in the continuing vitality of Ifa divination and a Yoruba way of life and thought.
This landmark study of Ifa, the most important and elaborate system of divination of the Yoruba people of Nigeria, remains a monumental contribution to scholarship in anthropology, folklore, religion, philosophy, linguistics, and African and African-American studies.

This book is a wonderful insight to the Yoruba religion and culture for students and practitioners alike. IFA Divination is a must have to any avid collector, practitioner, or student of African Religion, Yoruba culture or Ifa practice in the Western world. Click Here Ifa Divination: Communication between Gods and Men in West Africa (Midland Book)


Practitioner's Handbook for the IFA Professional was written with the initiated, practicing Babaláwo and Ìyánífá in mind. It is awesome! It's purpose is to offer enough information to those Awo's who may not have access to a local teacher of Ifa. At least you can work with confidence until you can hook up with the correct Oluwo-Ifa. 

--Ìbà: from Oyeku Ogbè (Oyekuu Logbè) and Ogbè Ìrosùn (Ogbè-Dòsùnmú) 

--IFÁ ipabi (Ifá chant prior to breaking obì àbàtà for libation) 
--IFÁ chant for omi tutu (Ifá chant when using omi tútù for libation) 
--IFÁ chant for ase (from Ose Òtúrá) 
--ELEMENTS OF EBO: 
(1) Ebo against Ikú (death) 
(2) Ebo against Ìjà (quarrel) 
(3) Ebo against Ìrìnàjò (journey) 
(4) EBo for Prosperity 
(5) Ebo for Ire (good fortune) 
(6) Ebo to have a Child 
(7) Ebo for a Peaceful Life 
(8) Ebo for Victory 
(9) Ebo against ejo (litigation) 
--Ewé for Minor Ifá Work ... 
--Ifá/Òrìsà Grove... 
--Ifa chant when making ebo to Èsu 
--Ifa chant when offering oti to Orunmila-from Owonrin Odi (Owonrin Sìdin) 
--Omi ero 
--IFÁ aseta (Ifá chant to repel curse) 
--Ìkoseday 
--Yanle (known as 'ase' in the Diaspora) 
--Eerindinlogun, eejo, and eerin (cowrie Shell Divinatio) 
--YORÙBÁ words of wisdom 
--YORÙBÁ GRAMMAR 
--Much more educative information!





No comments:

Post a Comment